Author: rusdi123


Benefits of Buying Coffee Wholesale for Your Home or Business

May 9, 2018

Coffee

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For most of us, coffee is a daily necessity. This magically caffeinated plant travels from points all over the globe to be ground, brewed, and poured into your mug, providing you with the needed fuel to face your day’s many challenges.

Nowadays, your daily brew isn’t just about perking up and getting to work on time. With so many types of beans, blends, and brewing techniques, sippers have a lot to consider before filling their mugs. Luckily, independent roasters are everywhere, giving the aficionado easy access to his or her ideal cup. Let’s look at why buying coffee wholesale from a local roaster can be a great way to improve the way your home or business gets its caffeine fix.

Unique Tastes from One-of-a-Kind Varieties

A bean is a bean, right? Well, not quite. Every bean has its own taste and texture, and a single bean can activate a whole slew of different taste buds. Your cup’s flavor depends on the precise conditions under which the original crop was raised. The climate, altitude, and soil of each farm makes for endless variation in the world’s coffee supply. Local roasters bring you fresh beans from all over the world, often from small, non-commercial farms where the coffee grows like no other. As a result, buying from wholesalers lets you sample rare, unique crops. Whether you operate a restaurant, manage an office, or drink cup after cup at home, buying directly from a wholesaler offers a unique, delicious experience for anyone under your roof.

Precision Roasting and Unparalleled Freshness

Local wholesalers roast their product right in your area, making for extremely fresh brewing. Once beans are shipped in, they undergo a roasting process that determines their body and texture. Independent companies take care to heat each variety perfectly in order to spotlight its characteristic flavors. Precision is the name of the game: independent outfits spend more time perfecting their final product than the average grocery-store brand does. Since the final product travels straight from the roaster to you, it arrives with its natural flavors fully intact.

Proprietary Blends Mixed By the Pros

By buying coffee wholesale, you support a company that’s truly passionate about crafting the perfect cup for every palate. Independent sellers take pride in the creative process, laboring to break new ground and synthesize new blends that taste unlike anything that came before. Many small companies concoct their own proprietary blends, mixing light and dark beans in precise ratios to create flavor complements that will knock drinkers’ socks off. This artisanal spirit sets smaller local roasters apart from commercial giants, which don’t stray far from a few basic blends. Buying coffee wholesale lets you participate in the experiment. You can bravely sample new blends and roasts and give your business or household access to an exciting rotation of fresh brews.

As you can see, coffee isn’t just about waking up. If you and your family members, customers, or co-workers crave a cup that’s fresh, delicious, and unique, consider buying coffee wholesale from a nearby roaster.

Now Brewing Hot: Brazilian Coffee

May 9, 2018

Coffee

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When we think of the best coffee, we primarily think of Brazilian coffee. This is because Brazil produces some of the world’s best coffee and has done so for the past 150 years! It all started in 1727 in Pará, Brazil, when Francisco de Melo Palheta planted the first tree. With coffee production starting in Pará, it arrived in Rio de Janeiro gradually by 1770.

Initially, it was planted just for the sole consumption of Brazil. All things changed in the 19th century when Europe and America started demanding more of this Brazilian coffee. So by 1820, plantations started to take root in the Brazilian regions of Mina Gerais, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro—by then, the country was producing 20% of the world’s coffee. When 1830 came, coffee was the largest export of Brazil, which was already 30% of the world’s production!

From the span of 1880 to 1930, Brazil had a substantial increase in coffee production. By 1920, Brazil supplied 80% of the world’s coffee (imagine having almost the entire world dependent on you for coffee!). In more recent times, Brazil supplies almost 60% of the world’s total production (still not a bad feat to be producing for more than half the world).

So, why was there such a clamor for Brazilian coffee and why is it still true today? Perhaps it can be credited to their unique picking method. Brazil strip picks it traditionally—this means that they will only make a pass or two on a tree. So if there is uneven ripening, all levels of ripeness are chosen.

But even beyond their traditional picking method, Brazil makes such great tasting coffee because they go the natural and pulped natural method route in terms of processing. If you would ask a regular Brazilian on the street about this method, they might just inform you that this traditional processing for the past 150 years (even before pulping machines were available) has helped create this very unique Brazilian coffee blend of complexity and sweetness.

What many do not realize, however, is that Brazilian coffee is very popular, also because of its great diversity throughout the country. Traditionally and through specialty coffee, Brazilian coffee is known to be nutty, mildly sweet, and full of body. Nowadays, through advancements in processing and sorting, it can be intensely sweet with chocolate and caramel notes and complimentary acidic.

The diversity in Brazilian coffee is also brought about by the different coffee growing regions in the country. In the largest coffee-growing region of Brazil, Minas Gerais covers 50% of the country’s production and produces its main specialty coffee sources. The region of São Paulo, on the other hand, is one of the more traditional areas in Brazil for growing, producing pure Arabica coffee, and home to Port of Santos, where coffee leaves Brazil. Espiritu Santo, another growing region, is second in Brazilian coffee production, with 28% of its coffee being Arabica. The warm climate and high altitude region of Bahia, farms 75% Arabica coffee, while the Parana region grows Arabica coffee exclusively. Lastly, the region of Rodonia is dedicated solely to Conilon or Robusta coffee.